MAY 25 & 26 2022

VIRTUALLY

Prevention through Design Workshop 2022

Keynote Speakers:

Chuck Gessner

Head of Safety

Vera C. Rubin Observatory

Alistair Gibb, Ph.D.

Emeritus Professor

Loughborough University

Andrew F. Griffith, Ph.D.

Director

Independent Project Analysis Institute

Matthew R. Hallowell, Ph.D.

Professor

University of Colorado at Boulder

Billy Hare, Ph.D.

Professor

Glasgow Caledonian University

Carisa Harris-Adamson, Ph.D., CPE

Associate Professor

University of California San Francisco

Joseph Hitt, Ph.D.

Co-Founder and CEO

GoX Labs

Jason Hopper

Director of Preconstruction

Mortenson

Victor Krabbendam

Project Manager

Vera C. Rubin Observatory

Justin Riley

Senior MEP Superintendent

Mortenson

Thomas Sugar, Ph.D., PE

Professor

Arizona State University

Jochen Teizer, Ph.D.

Professor

Technical University of Denmark

Continuing Education Unit (CEU) credits will be offered

Introduction to the Workshop by TJ Lyons

PtD Journey from What to How

NIOSH has funded a series of annual workshops to advance PtD knowledge, promote the implementation of PtD, and promote the instruction of PtD in construction management and related engineering programs at US colleges and universities.

This third virtual, interactive PtD workshop will focus on HOW to implement PtD practices to increase safety, efficiency, and profitability while striving for zero accidents and injuries. Examples of PtD applications, including case studies and benchmarking results, will be provided to demonstrate how PtD enhances a project’s safety and provides a safe environment for workers and end-users. Moreover, this workshop will explore how various emerging technologies such as wearables, exoskeletons, and Building Information Modelling (BIM) improve workers’ safety, and contribute to innovative PtD practices.

This 2022 Workshop will create an excellent opportunity for engineers, architects, contractors, construction companies, manufacturers, project owners, insurers, and academia to exchange and leverage their experiences and expertise in terms of how PtD practices are implemented for a safer environment.

 

May 25 and 26, 2022

8 am to 1 pm Pacific Daylight Time (GMT-7) 

Virtually

NIOSH-award #1 R13OH011707-01-00

Registration

Tentative Agenda

May 25
8:00-8:15 Welcome and Introduction 
  Dr. David Grau (Arizona State University)
   
8:15-8:55 Energy-Based Hazard Recognition in Design
  Dr. Matt Hallowell (University of Colorado at Boulder)
   
  Driving Superior Construction Safety Performance Begins Early
  Dr. Andrew Griffith (Independent Project Analysis Institute)
   
8:55-9:15 Q&A (Moderator: Dr. John Gambatese)
   
9:15-9:30 Networking Break
   
  Wearables and Exoskeletons in Prevention through Design
9:30-9:45 Exoskeletons: Assisting Human Movement
  Dr. Thomas Sugar (Arizona State University)
   
9:45-10:00 Impact of Wearables and Data on PtD
  Dr. Joe Hitt (GoX Labs)
   
10:00-10:15 Using Survey Data to Inform Prevention through Design Translational Research
  Dr. Carisa Harris-Adamson (University of California San Francisco)
   
10:15-10:45 Q&A (Moderator: Dr. Babak Memarian)
   
10:45-11:00 Networking Break
   
11:00-11:20 BIM and Prevention through Design
  Dr. Jochen Teizer (Technical University of Denmark)
   
11:20-11:40 Q&A (Moderator: Dr. Zia Ud Din)
   
11:40-11:50 Summary and Wrapup (Dr. David Grau)
   
11:50-12:00 Networking Break
   
12:00-13:00 Virtual Speaker Rooms with Moderators
   
   
May 26  
8:00-8:10 Welcome and Introduction 
  Dr. Edd Gibson (Arizona State University)
   
8:10-8:50 Lessons Learnt from UK PtD Legislation
  Dr. Billy Hare (Glasgow Caledonian University)
   
  Highlighting Current Learning from the UK’s PtD Construction
  Dr. Alistair Gibb (Loughborough University)
   
8:50-9:15 Q&A (Moderator: Dr. Scott Earnest)
   
9:15-9:30 Networking Break
   
9:30-9:55 How Big Astronomy is Using Prevention thru Design to Succeed
  Chuck Gessner and Victor Krabbendam (Vera C. Rubin Observatory)
   
9:55-10:25 Panel (Moderator: Mark Grushka; Panelists: Victor Krabbendam, Austin Roberts, and Chuck Gessner)
   
10:25-10:40 Networking Break
   
10:40-11:05 Mortenson: a Journey to Zero, a Case Study
  Jason Hopper and Justin Riley (Mortenson)
   
11:05-11:35 Panel (Moderator: TJ Lyons; Panelists: Jason Hopper and Justin Riley)
   
11:35-11:50 Summary and Wrapup (Dr. Edd Gibson)
   
11:50-12:00 Networking Break
   
12:00-13:00 Virtual Speaker Rooms with Moderators

Keynote Presentations

Dr. Matthew R. Hallowell, Ph.D.

Professor

University of Colorado at Boulder

Energy-Based Hazard Recognition in Design

Research has consistently shown that workers are able to recognize about half of the hazards during construction. These skills are relatively low, even with knowledge of the means and methods of construction, the specific construction environment, and the work team. Effective prevention through design (PtD) requires that designers are able to anticipate construction hazards as the work is being conceptualized. Undoubtedly, anticipating hazards in design is far more challenging that recognizing hazards once they have emerged. This study investigated the proportion of hazards that are identified in design and demonstrated how energy-based hazard recognition (i.e., the energy wheel), helps to improve hazard recognition in PtD reviews by approximately 30%. This empirical study suggests that even with little knowledge of the specific construction means and methods, designers may significantly improve their ability to anticipate and address hazards by using simple cognitive reminders.

Short Bio

Dr. Matthew Hallowell is a President’s Teaching Scholar and the K. Stanton Lewis Professor of Engineering at the University of Colorado at Boulder. He is also the Executive Director of the Construction Safety Research Alliance. He earned a BS and MS in Civil Engineering and a PhD with a focus on Construction Engineering and Occupational Safety and Health. Before his academic career, he worked in construction as a laborer, project engineer, and quality inspector.

Dr. Andrew F. Griffith, Ph.D.

Director

IPA Institute and Industry Benchmarking Consortium

Driving Superior Construction Safety Performance Begins Early

As part of its capital project benchmarking work with large industrial owner companies, Independent Project Analysis, Inc. (IPA) collects detailed project data during the front end planning/definition phase of projects prior to project authorization for detailed design and construction, and again after mechanical completion and startup.Data collected from each project includes actual construction safety performance and total field hours. These data, which includes data from over 3,000 completed projects worth more than $700 Billion (US $ 2022) TPC, consistently show that proper development of the project during the definition phase drives better construction safety performance. This presentation will share IPA data that correlates the level of definition at authorization with established measures of construction safety performance. It will relate how superior safety performance practices in the definition phase can positively impact a stable, effective and safe execution phase.

Short Bio

Andrew is the Director of the Independent Project Analysis (IPA) Institute and has been with IPA since 1997, working as a Master Analyst and internal reviewer, and has led benchmarking studies, research studies, and individual project evaluations. Andrew is also an Adjunct Professor at George Washington University, Washington, D.C. His areas of expertise are project execution planning, project planning and scheduling, project system evaluations and reengineering, civil and building projects, construction safety, constructability reviews, and training. Prior to joining IPA, Andrew worked on capital projects as a design engineer, controls engineer, site project engineer, and project engineer for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. He received an award from the Sverdrup Corporation and a certificate of appreciation from the U.S. Department of State for his exemplary role in the U.S. Embassy Compound Project. Andrew holds a B.S. degree in Civil Engineering from Clemson University and an M.S. and a Ph.D. degree in Civil Engineering from the University of Texasat Austin. Andrew is a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), the Project Management Institute (PMI), and the American Association of Cost Engineers. He is a Registered Professional Engineer State of South Carolina and a certified Project Management Professional (PMP). He has authored research studies, published numerous articles, and has given presentations at conferences held by PMI, AACE, and the ASCE.

Dr. Thomas Sugar, Ph.D., PE

Professor

Arizona State University

Exoskeletons: Assisting Human Movement

Dr. Sugar has been studying gait assistance for the ankle, knee, and hip.In this presentation, he will describe the design of an exoskeleton tailored to the tasks of pushing and lifting objects on to large cargo airplanes. The APEx or Aerial Porter exoskeleton was designed and tested by the US Air Force over an eight-week period on a base during regular missions.The over arching goal is to reduce Musculo-skeletal injuries in these very demanding logistics tasks.

Short Bio

Dr. Thomas Sugar works in the areas of wearable robotics for rehabilitation and gait assistance. He teaches design and project courses in the areas of mechanical design and robotics at the Arizona State University, Polytechnic campus. He is the program chair for Systems Engineering and the Associate Dean for Barrett, The Honors College at the Polytechnic campus.In industry, he worked as a project engineer for W. L. Gore and Associates earning a Professional Engineering License. He majored in business and mechanical engineering for his bachelor’s degrees and mechanical engineering for his Master’s and Doctoral degree all from the University of Pennsylvania. He is developing passive and powered exoskeletons for improved worker wellness.

Dr. Joseph Hitt, Ph.D.

Co-Founder and CEO

GoX Labs

Impact of Wearables and Data on PtD

Key predictors of injury include fatigue, fitness, forces, form and environment. Wearables can collect accurate data regarding these predictors upstream to identify the risks per individual and their work environment. Changes in behavior and work conditions can be implemented to reduce these risks to prevent future injuries in a data driven closed loop process. To date, we have seen overexertion injury reduction of 50% utilizing this approach.

Short Bio

Dr. Joe Hitt is the Co-founder and CEO of GoX Labs and DARPA Program Manager for exoskeletons, humanoid robotics, guided bullets, and wearable technology. Dr. Hitt is an Associate Professor at the United States Military Academy, ranked #2 in the national Mechanical Engineering Program. He started the biomechanics program at the United States Military Academy. Moreover, he is a highly successful business owner who took his first company from 2 to over 400 employees under contract in 36 months.  It was #27 on the INC 500 in 2019. Additionally, he created the world’s first bionic running leg showcased on the DISCOVERY CHANNEL with a Special Forces amputee running at eight mph four months after losing his limb. 

Dr. Carisa Harris-Adamson, Ph.D., CPE

Associated Professor, Director COEH & UC Ergonomics Research Program

University of California, San Francisco & Berkeley

Using Survey Data to Inform Prevention through Design Translational Research

Construction workers continue to experience high rates of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) –11% higher than all other industry sectors in 2016(BLS, 2016; Wang, Dong, Choi, & Dement, 2017). Occupational exoskeletons (EXOs) are a rapidly-emerging technology with clear potential for beneficial applications in the workplace. To facilitate the safe and effective adoption and use of EXOs in construction, workers perceptions about EXOs need to be assessed and addressed to optimize acceptance and implementation.Between July 2020 and January 2021, construction industry stakeholders completed a self-administered online survey after viewing a 3-minute introductory video on exoskeletons. The survey included 70 open-and closed-ended questions regarding prior exoskeleton knowledge, work history, personal factors, task characteristics, perceived benefits, perceived health and safety concerns, and facilitators for adoption and use of exoskeletons in construction.

A total of 361 respondents completed the survey. Roughly 84% indicated that exoskeletons would be beneficial for construction workers, with half noting it would become standard equipment. Only 10% had tried an exoskeleton. About three-quarters of respondents thought that exoskeletons would reduce fatigue, 70% noted that it would make their work easier and 62%thought it could make them more productive. Potential barriers to exoskeleton use included numerous safety concerns, such as increased slips/trips/falls, interference with tool belts, hindering movement when climbing poles or ladders, and conductive/dangerous when performing electrical work. Sharing and adjusting exoskeletons was also a concern.

Results from the survey and interviews have guided the methodology to assess safety concerns for using the exoskeleton in construction, which is currently underway. Additional laboratory testing will compare exoskeleton design characteristics and settings for optimization of use during tasks that vary load, posture and frequency. This talk will review some of the key findings from the survey and how the results were used to drive additional research on safety and fit guidelines

Short Bio 

Carisa Harris-Adamson, PhD, CPE is an Associate Professor in the Department of Medicine at the University of California at San Francisco (UCSF). She is the Director of the Northern California Center of Occupational & Environmental Health at the University of California at Berkeley, Associate Director of research for the California Labor Lab (a NIOSH Total Worker Health Center) and the Director of the UCSF/UCB Ergonomics Research & Graduate Training Program. Dr. Harris and her team performs research in a variety of areas focused on understanding and preventing work related injuries and improving human performance, productivity, and health. Her team applies machine learning to wearable device data for primary and secondary prevention purposes and performs various intervention studies on occupational tasks with high risk of musculoskeletal injuries. Her epidemiological research assesses and adjusts for healthy worker survivor bias in the assessment of physical, personal and work psychosocial factors associated with musculoskeletal disorders and subsequent work disability. She and her team also engage in applied research in high injury sectors such as construction and janitorial work.

Dr. Jochen Teizer, Ph.D.

Professor

Technical University of Denmark

BIM and Prevention through Design

Planning of construction projects and monitoring the vital status of site resources at the right time, understanding of their spatial relationships in a dynamically changing work environment, and monitoring, analyzing, and visualizing site activities and conditions of progress, are a few of the critical issues that become increasingly important when industry leaders intend to base decision making on a solid information content. However, key values that are essential among project stakeholders to deliver successful projects are often not readily and reliably available. The essence of this issue is driving the ongoing efforts in digitalizing existing construction safety processes in organizations. Digital Twins in the construction phase, for example, envision the creation of augmented workplaces saturated with sensing, communication, computing, and visualization techniques that also predict future states and enable proactive control. This presentation introduces Prevention through Design (PtD) efforts in three ongoing EU-and Danish-funded research projects. These will enable digital planning, monitoring and controlling for more productive, safer, and emissions-free work environments. Concepts, workflows, and early results to these Digital Twins in PtD applications will be shown and discussed.

Short Bio

Jochen Teizer is Professor in the Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) where his research seeks injury-free, lean, and green construction work environments. He earned a Ph.D. from The University of Texas at Austin in 2006 and a Dipl.-Ing. from the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology in Germany in 2002. Dr. Teizer is the Director of the Construction Automation and Information Technologies Laboratory and Vice-President for Industry Membership and Outreach of the International Association for Automation and Robotics in Construction (IAARC). He held several visiting researcher positions in the USA (e.g., NIST), Japan (e.g., Osaka University), and Germany (e.g., Technische Universität München). Since 2006, he pioneered and successfully led research and development projects with funding of more than €40 million for right-time proactive construction safety, health, and wellbeing. He has over 280 peer-reviewed publications in books, journals, and conference proceedings. His team received numerous teaching and research awards from academia and the construction industry. Jochen Teizer serves as a visionary evangelist and consultant for the AEC/FM industry. More details about his work can be found at www.teizer.com.

Dr. Billy Hare, Ph.D., BSC (Hon), BA, MCIOB

Professor

Glasgow Caledonian University

Lessons Learnt form UK PtD Legislation

Billy’s keynote will view PtD through a UK lens, reviewing how the introduction of the Construction (Design and Management) Regulations (CDM) have shaped the designer’s role in helping to manage Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) risks during the construction phase and beyond. Lessons learnt from the difficulties of trying to enforce PtD with legislation will be explored, including the unintended consequences and good practice that has resulted. He will also present findings from innovative research on what influences designers when carrying out their legal duty to eliminate hazards, reduce risks and provide OSH information. Limitations of depending exclusively on BIM to solve OSH problems and potential solutions to bridge the learning gap will also be shared, with actionable takeaways that can help with strategies for PtD.

Short Bio

Billy is a Professor of Construction Management within the School of Computing Engineering & Built Environment at GCU. He is Research Theme Lead for Built Environments, Deputy Director of the School’s Research Centre for ‘Built Environment & Asset Management’ (BEAM). Billy has a PhD in Construction Management (H&S Thesis); BSc (Hons) in Construction Management & Engineering and a BA in Occupational Health and Safety. He has delivered research on several HSE, IOSH, EPSRC, CITB and industry funded projects totalling over £900k, 50+ peer-reviewed publications and Impact Case Studies for the UK Research Excellence Framework. His research portfolio is mainly focused on improving safety health and wellbeing within the construction industry, including studies that have improved worker engagement, migrant worker H&S, and safety in design. He has developed several CPD courses on the subject of construction health and safety, and is currently International Coordinator of the ‘International Council for Research and Innovation in Building and Construction’ Safety Health and Wellbeing Working Group.

Dr. Alistair Gibb, Ph.D.

Emeritus Professor

Loughborough University

Highlighting Current Learning from the UK’s PtD Construction

Alistair’s keynote will build on Professor Hare’s, highlighting current learning from the UK’s PtD Construction (Design and Management)(CDM) Regulations. He will draw on his 30 year experience of the US context of implementing PtD without the legislative driver that is present in the UK. He will also introduce new research into the exploitation of digital innovation and Building Information Modelling (BIM) to improve Occupational Safety and Health (BIM4OSH). Working with industrialists from major infrastructure construction projects, the team proposes setting up a BIM4OSH Observatory as a repository for lessons learned and good practice. Alistair will also bring learning from the latest UK legislation instigated following London’s Grenfell Tower disaster. This major legislation will have a major impact on UK design and construction, explicitly requiring both designers and contractors to consider the safety of the users of the building or facility. It is seen as a significant move onwards from the CDM regulations and will require decisions taken regarding safety-critical elements to form a ‘golden thread’ from inception through to end-user occupation and beyond.

Short Bio

Alistair has led a research team in construction innovation, safety and health for more than 28 years, pioneering work on the interaction between these two domains. He has led projects on nanotechnology, 3D concrete printing, offsite construction, platform technologies, transformational H&S, accident causality, and COVID. His research has engaged with mega-projects in the UK and across the globe. This has included pioneering work on Prevention through Design (PtD) in the USA over the last 20 years. He has been an influencer, working closely with the HSE, UK Government, professional institutions and industry. He currently serves on panels implementing learning from the Grenfell Tower disaster. Prior to joining Loughborough, he had a successful career as an engineer and construction manager on major projects.

Chuck Gessner

Head of Safety

Vera C. Rubin Observatory

Victor Krabbendam

Project Manager

Vera C. Rubin Observatory

Austin Roberts

Systems Engineering Manager

Vera C. Rubin Observatory

How Big Astronomy is Using Prevention thru Design to Succeed

Designing and building telescope projects requires a unique approach to managing risk. The development cycle in successfully completing “Big Science” projects require a complex interaction between theory, design, constructability, and mission achievement. The science and engineering technology required is often evolving as the project moves between phases. Finding, refining, and applying the correct elements and processes to manage large, often multi-national/multi-cultural telescopes being constructed in remote locations pose significant challenges. The presenters will share their unique experience integrating a foundational PtD support system over a multi-year basis of a world-class telescope now known as the Vera C. Rubin Construction Project in Chile.

Short Bio Chuck Gessner

Charles (Chuck) Gessner has been the Head of Safety for the Vera C. Rubin Observatory Project since 2007. He has 35 years of experience in providing safety expertise, hazard analysis, procedure development, training, and safety program management to the industry. He is proficient in program implementation, standards development, auditing, inspection, reporting procedures, and interpretation of and compliance with U.S. and Chilean Federal, State, and institutional laws, regulations, and procedures. Mr. Gessner has managed and mentored more than 40+ respected safety and health professionals throughout his career.

Short Bio Victor Krabbendam

Victor Krabbendam is the Project Manager for the Rubin Observatory Project. He has been with the Project for 18 years, from the formative conceptual stages to the current fully authorized construction project. During the early design phase of the project,he led the team responsible for the telescope and site infrastructure. Since 2014, he has been the Overall Project Manager, bringing the project through the Final Design Review, the start of formal construction as an NSF MREFC Project,and on to its current 85% completion. Victor has a 35-year career focused on the development, construction, and management of large optical systems for both ground and space applications. Prior to joining Rubin/LSST,he was the lead engineer and Project Manager for the SOAR four-meter telescope construction in Chile and before that the Primary Mirror and site Integration Manager for the 11-meter Hobby Eberly Telescope in Texas.

Short Bio Austin Roberts

Austin Roberts is the Systems Engineering Manager for the Vera C. Rubin Observatory. He has been with the Vera C. Rubin Observatory since 2018. Prior to joining the Vera C. Rubin Observatory, he spent 12 years in the Aerospace and Defense industry including Boeing, Raytheon, and B/E Aerospace as a Mechanical Engineer and then Systems Engineer. He has experience designing, analyzing, and integrating complex systems which require a very high level of System Safety and Reliability. He has specialized in Model Based Systems Engineering and has 2 MBSE certifications from the Object Management Group (OMG). He has worked with OMG as an industry collaborator for the last 4 years advancing the Systems Modeling Language (SysML) including the concepts for modeling Safety and Reliability Analyses.

Jason Hopper

Director of Design for Manufacture and Assembly (DFMA)

Mortenson

Justin Riley

Field Operations Manager

Mortenson

Mortenson: a Journey to Zero, a Case Study

This presentation will focus on the shift towards industrialization and manufactured products in the construction of hyperscale data centers. This approach includes the utilization of components, assemblies, and sub-assemblies which are manufactured in offsite facilities that allow for a reduction in onsite labor requirements, increased quality control, and reduction in safety exposure for site installed features. The presentation will highlight specific case studies that illustrate the benefits of Design For Manufacturing and Assembly (DFMA) and design for safety practices that are being utilized on several data center projects.

Short Bio Jason Hopper

Jason Hopper, Director of Design for Manufacture and Assembly (DFMA), evaluates opportunities for DFMA products to assist in customer stated objective and works closely with Mortenson’s manufacturing team to implement DFMA products on projects. He is responsible for detailed development and design support of off-site manufactured components to be included in on site construction. Jason also monitors key performance indicators (KPI’s) for manufactured products and works to continually improve effectiveness, reduce safety risks, and provide a controlled environment for our craft workers.

Short Bio Justin Riley

Justin is a proven performer with 30 years of industry experience and has been an essential leader in the success that Mortenson has had in executing work with our customers and providing leadership to our teams. In Justin’s role, he has overall responsibility for the execution of all work on Mortenson’s data center projects and ensures that each data center is completed in accordance with design, budget, schedule, and quality standards. His experience in leading complex data center projects supports our team in delivering our customers an exceptional customer experience.

Moderators

Dr. John Gambatese, Ph.D., PE

Professor

School of Civil and Construction Engineering, Oregon State University

Short Bio

Dr. Gambatese’s educational background includes Bachelor and Master of Science degrees in Civil Engineering from the University of California at Berkeley, and a PhD in Civil Engineering from the University of Washington. He has worked in industry for six years as a structural engineer in San Francisco and for one year as a project engineer for a construction management firm in Seattle. Dr. Gambatese’s expertise is in the broad areas of construction engineering and management, and structural engineering. He has performed research and published numerous articles on construction worker safety, work zone design and safety, prevention through design, risk management, sustainability, constructability, innovation, and construction contracting. He is a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) and American Society of Safety Professionals (ASSP). He is a licensed Professional Civil Engineer in California.

Dr. Babak Memarian, Ph.D., CSP, CHST

Director, Exposure Control Technologies Research

CPWR – The Center for Construction Research & Training

Short Bio

Dr. Babak Memarian is the Director of Exposure Control Technologies Research at CPWR – The Center for Construction Research and Training and the co-chair of the NIOSH/CPWR Engineering Controls Workgroup. He currently leads a NIOSH-funded project titled “Prevention through Augmented Pre-Task Planning.” He holds a Ph.D. in Construction Management from Arizona State University and a M.S. in Civil Engineering with a concentration in Construction Engineering & Project Management from Oklahoma State University. His research interest involves development of high reliability production systems with a focus on safety & health, production improvement, and error management.  He is an active member of the American Society of Safety Professionals. Dr. Memarian is also a Certified Safety Professional (CSP) and Construction Health and Safety Technician (CHST).

Dr. Zia Ud Din, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor

University of Houston

Short Bio

Dr. Zia Din is an assistant professor in the Department of Construction Management at the University of Houston. Dr. Din’s research interests include constructability analysis, construction safety, innovative pedagogies, and construction information technology. He is particularly interested in using immersive visual technologies to improve construction safety and productivity. His current research focuses on using augmented and virtual reality technology to improve the effectiveness of risk identification in construction. Dr. Din takes great pride in his teaching. Since 2017, he has taught various undergraduate and graduate courses at Arizona State University and the University of Houston. In recent years, Dr. Din has taught courses such as “Project Controls,” “Building Information Modeling Applications for Construction Management,” and “LEED and Green Construction Principles in Construction Management”.

Dr. Scott Earnest, Ph.D., PE., CSP

Associate Director for Construction

NIOSH

Short Bio

Scott Earnest is the Associate Director for Construction Safety and Health at NIOSH. Prior to joining the Office of Construction Safety and Health, Scott was Engineering Branch Chief in the NIOSH, Division of Applied Research and Technology from 2005-2015. Scott has over 70 peer reviewed publications and technical reports. He began his career as an active duty, commissioned officer in the U.S. Army, Corps of Engineers. He is a registered Professional Engineer (PE) and Certified Safety Professional (CSP) with M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in industrial and mechanical engineering.

Mark J. Grushka, M.S., CSP

Principal Consultant and Owner

MJGrushka Consulting

Short Bio

Mark J. Grushka is the Principal Consultant and Owner of MJGrushka Consulting in Tucson, Arizona. He has been assisting organizations achieve high levels of measurable safety, health and environmental performance for over 40 years. He has held a number of technical and managerial positions in both the private and public sectors including the University of Arizona, BHP Copper, Columbia University’s Biosphere 2 Project and Tucson Medical Center. He holds a Master of Science Degree in Safety Management from Northern Illinois University and is a Board-Certified Safety Professional. He holds a postgraduate certification in environmental management from Arizona State University. He has a special interest in Prevention through Design and has supported ASU’s Fulton Schools of Engineering Prevention through Design Initiative since 2012.

TJ Lyons, OHST, CSP, CRIS

Safety Professional

DPR Construction

Short Bio

Mr. Lyons is a safety professional working for DPR Construction. He supports field teams and operations in the United States from Malta, New York.  Board-certified as an Occupational Health and Safety Technologist and Certified Safety Professional, he is proud to have taken some of these skills to his local community. A past assistant chief, New York adjutant fire instructor (hazardous materials), emergency medical technician, and still a volunteer firefighter, he sees the need to bring safety from the field to the home as often as possible. His safety passion is focused on working with people and the idea of preventing incidents through the smarter design of the structure being built and the way the building is built. Rather than install roof anchors on a flat roof and hope everyone will remember to attach their fall protection, build common parapets around the roof to eliminate the fall itself, implementing simple steps that he calls “design intervention.

Dr. David Grau, Ph.D., PE

Associate Professor

School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment (SSEBE), Arizona State University

Short Bio

David Grau (“au” pronounced like “ow” in allow) is an assistant professor in the School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment at Arizona State University. Grau graduated with both a masters degree and doctorate in civil, architectural, and environmental engineering from the University of Texas at Austin, and with an industrial engineering degree from the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya in Spain. Previous to his affiliation with ASU, he taught at the University of Alabama as an assistant professor for four years. During his academic career, Grau has received numerous teaching and research awards, including the Distinguished Professor Award by the Construction Industry Institute and the Celebration of Engineering & Technology Innovation (CETI) award by FIATECH. Complementing his academic career, he has worked in the private industry for more than 10 years inclusive of positions such as program manager for heavy industrial projects and director of a large engineering design department. He has led large interdisciplinary and multicultural teams to deliver numerous capital projects in South America, Africa and Europe. Grau is a member of ASCE and ASEE professional societies and holds a professional license as Industrial Engineer in Spain.

Dr. George Edward Gibson, Jr., Ph.D., PE, NAC, Dist.M.ASCE

Professor and Sunstate Chair of Construction Management and Engineering

School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment (SSEBE), Arizona State University

Short Bio

Dr. Gibson is currently a Professor and holds the Sunstate Chair in Construction Management and Engineering in the School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment (SSEBE) at Arizona State University. From 2010 to 2018, he served as SSEBE School Director, overseeing significant growth in its programs and rankings. In addition to ASU, he served on the faculty of North Carolina State, University of Texas at Austin, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa and as an instructor at Auburn University.  His educational background includes a B.S. and Ph.D. in Civil Engineering from Auburn University and an M.B.A. from the University of Dallas. Dr. Gibson has been PI or co-PI on over $10.8 million worth of funded research in his career with research and teaching interests that include front end planning, safety leadership and systems, prevention through design, organizational change, asset management, alternative dispute resolution, knowledge management, earned value management systems, and risk management among others. Dr. Gibson has several years of industry experience, served as an Army officer, and is a licensed professional engineer in Texas.  He is an elected member of the National Academy of Construction (NAC) in 2005 and a Distinguished Member of ASCE in 2020.  He was awarded the 2016 ASCE R. L. Peurifoy Award for outstanding research and the 2020 Richard L. Tucker Service Award from NAC; he served as a Visiting Academic Fellow at Cambridge University in spring 2019.

Contact

David Grau, Ph.D., PE david.grau@asu.edu

G. Edward Gibson Jr, Ph.D., PE GEdwardGibsonJr@asu.edu